Thursday, April 14, 2016

BRS 16 Bald Hills & Bracken Ridge Way of Life


By 1894, the area had a reputation for excellence in agriculture, as this report tells.  Imagination is required, as to where each farm was located, however the areas bounded by Bracken Ridge to Zillmere across to Ridley Road and up to Bald Hills Road, would be a good indicator.










FRUIT AND ECONOMIC PLANT
GROWERS' ASSOCIATION.

A correspondent kindly supplies the following :-On Saturday last the working council of the Fruit and Economic Plant Growers' Association, consisting of Messrs. T. G. Corrie (president), J. Henderson, W. Soutter, John Williams, and F. M. Bailey, F.L.S. (lion, botanist), journeyed to Zillmere by the early train to make a tour of inspection round the gardens and plantations of that district. On arrival the party were mot at the railway station by Mr. Davis (Hutton and Co.), Mr. H. Robinson, and Mr. A. Wagner, who with their buggies drove tho visitors round. Mr. Davis, who acted as pilot, had mapped out a section of the district for the morning's work.

The first place of call was at the pine garden of Mr. John Krimmer, whose place was closely inspected and found to be satisfactory, the area of pines being about five acres. About a quarter of a mile drive landed the party at the residence of Mr. T. Bridges, who cultivates a 10-acre patch of pines and fruit trees. The pines looked well, and the trees were in good order. Adjoining this was a garden belonging to Mr. J. Hillier, who has a patch of pines and a number of fruit trees, the older of which appeared to stand much in need of the knife. Pretty much the same conditions prevailed on Mr. Philip's farm, which adjoins. Here an attempt to grow bananas had been made, but last winter had proved too cold for this crop. Grape vines are being tried, but have been planted much too close.

The next visit was to the pine patch of Albury Bros., who farm a 10-acre block, eight of which are in pines, and four in full bearing. These men deserve great credit for their energy. Six years ago the land was covered with native timber, and since January of the present year they have exported close on 3000 cases of pineapples to the markets of the colonies. Although the land was admirably adapted for pine culture, cultivation and drainage had not been neglected, the result being that Albury's plantation   was the best seen in the district.

Mr. Roghan's farm, which lies on the north side of Albury's, is devoted chiefly to growing general crops for dairy purposes, and at the time of our visit all hands were busy gathering a crop of potatoes.

On a ridge to the westward of this place, distant about a quarter of a mile, is the garden of Mr. W. Jacklin, who works on the lines of growing a variety of fruits, and has already a considerable number of trees planted, which he intends to increase largely next season.

On the opposite side of the Government road Mr. W. Krinmer has a patch of eight acres under crop, mostly pines ; he has also two fair-sized squares of cucumbers and watermelons.

This garden has only been started three years. From the crown of this hill the road leads to the westward down to Cabbage- tree Creek ; at the foot of the slope the buggies swerved off to the left, due south, and upon emerging from a native belt of forest, with a dense undergrowth of lantana, a patch of orange trees was noted. A halt was made, and the party soon crossed the grass paddock to examine these hoes. They were well repaid for tho trouble ; the trees are over 30ft. high, with a spread of branches 34ft. across, and a stem diameter at the butt of 22m. They are seedling trees, and are  25 or 26 years old. From enquiries made, the trees, three in  number, yield enormous crops yearly but no record has ever been kept as to their actual production.
The plants are the property of Mr. W. Werner, who is an old settler in the district, and who might with great advantage make an orange grove in view of the satisfactory way in which the orange seems to thrive, although utterly  neglected as regards cultivation

Half-an -hours easy drive and the visitors were landed at the residence of Mr. Davis, at the factory of pineapple ham fame. Mr. Davis had prepared a" most sumptuous lunch, to which ample justice was done, after which' the cultivation attached to the fruitery was gone over.  About ;30 acres are under the plough namely, 10 acres of pineapples, 10 acres of fruit trees, and 10 acres of miscellaneous crops. The pines are tho picture of the hill, and the older plants show for a very heavy yield. The fruit trees, although young, have made great head-way, and promise well. Among the trees are planted tomatoes, which are yielding a heavy crop. Provision is made for irrigating the orchard was desirable, and the land is heavily manured.

 At 2 p.m. tho party was increased by Messrs. W. Joness, W. Krimmer, and Mr. Jacklin. A start was made for Bald Hills, and en route a call was made upon Mr. Thomas Ridley, and a few interesting items noted, Mr. Ridley's garden is well kept. A quarter-mile drive brought tho party to the orchard of Mr. R. Capner, the soil and situation of which are perfect; but an even greater expenditure of labour is necessary to keep things in order. A call was made on Mr. M. It. Ridley, whoso five-acre patch of cultivation was gone over, and notwithstanding that Mr. Ridley has clay subsoil to deal with, his results are good. He, however, needs to apply manure.

The party walked by a near cut through the pine garden of Mr. William Young, where good pines and careful cultivation were noted. Tho farm adjoining belongs to Mr. T'. Gorring. Here the party were astonished to find a large patch of strawberries looking remarkably well and splendidly cultivated. It was a strange sight to see strawberries, pineapple, cabbages, carrots, marrows, mangóes, all growing side by side, and all thriving well-enough to make the average European incredulous. Again on this road, tracks were made for the farm of Mr. It. Sumner, who has about ten acres of pines, which yield him upwards of 3000 cases of fruit per annum, Mr. Sumner has of late years cannot the greater part of his pines, which until recently have yielded him good returns. Mrs. Sumner kindly invited the visitors to sample tho canned pines both sliced and whole. They were much approbated after the long dusty drive.

Again on the road, with the horses' heads towards Zillmere, fifteen minutes saw the visitors on the farm of Mr. J. W. Lees. This gentleman is engaged in remodelling an old worn-out plantation. He has some excellent peaches planted, and is to put a considerable area under fruit trees next season. The next place of call was at Mr. Thomas Smith's farm. Mr. Smith has about twelve or more acres of pines looking really well, and no appearance of these-called disease. On the opposite side of the road a short visit was paid to Mr.  Robinson's pine garden. Here it was noticed that on the west slope of the ridge, which has a gravelly subsoil, the pines are flourishing, while on the eastern slope, where clay obtains, the plants are languishing or dead. Tho party next strolled through Mr. James Smith's pine patch, which is of a very sandy nature. Here years ago, during heavy weather, nearly all his pines died. The plants are now all right, except that here and there a small patch looks sick.

Over the fence is Mr. O, F. Fischer's orchard. This gentleman has got the foundation of the best orchard ig the whole district. His trees, although only a few years old, look splendid, and are yielding heavy toads of fruit. With a few practical hints, Mr. Fischer will succeed. The last point of call for tho day was at the garden of Mr. Duckwitz. He is busy uprooting all his old pines and replanting, with very satisfactory results.

In the gray twilight the party drove to the School of Arts, Zillmere, where the good folk of the neighbourhood had provided a first-rate tea for all the party. Upwards of twenty sat down to partake of the repast. At 8 o'clock a public meeting was held, at which there was a big roll up of fruit growers, about fifty being present. Mr. W. Jones was in the chair. He said the meeting was convened for the purpose of meeting tho visitors who had come from Brisbane to sec what they wore doing and to give advice, he called upon Mr. Corrie, tho president of the Fruitgrowers' Association, to address the meeting. '

Mr. Corrie, in a brief and pithy speech, said that he hoped that all the growers of the district would unite for the purpose of furthering tho interests of fruit-growing. The time had come when it was necessary for combination so that the fruitgrowers as a body could make their influence felt. They had many grievances to ventilate-and remedy. These could only be got at by concerted. notion, and he hoped that the Zillmere growers would form a branch of the Central Association.

Mr. D, Jones (Goodna) spoke in favour of forming a branch at Zillmere, and trusted that those present would see the advantage of becoming joined to the Central Council.

The Chairman called upon Mr. Soutter to relate his impression of the district of Zillmere. Mr. Soutter.it said that tho capabilities of the district were great. Mistakes had been made about Zillmere as in other places, especially in  the selection of sites for orchards, etc., and if the individuals did not remedy the evils where they existed nature would do it for them. He expressed himself as pleased with what  he had seen.

Mr. P. M. Bailey, who was also invited to speak, said he had a lot of fault to find, not with Zillmere especially, but with farmers and gardens generally. Cultivation in Queensland was carried on in a most slovenly fashion, and except this state of things were altered success could not be looked for.

Mr. Reid (Hutton and Co.), in a very neat and pithy speech, spoke of the advantages of forming a branch of the association in Zillmere, and proposed the following resolution: -"That it is desirable, in the interests of the fruitgrowers that a branch of the Fruit and Economic Plant Growers' Association be formed at Zillmere, and that a branch be now formed." Mr. T. Bridges seconded the resolution, and most warmly approved of the growers combining for their common welfare, Discussion ensued, in which Messrs. Lees, Ward, Sumner, and Fischer took part. Finally the resolution was carried unanimously, and the appointment of a committee and officers was deferred till after the ordinary business of the meeting.

A vote of thanks to the visitors was proposed by Mr. Lees, who said he hoped they would come to Zillmere again, and go round the district. Mr. H. Robinson seconded and Mr. Capner supported the resolution, which was carried with acclamation. Messrs. Corrie and Soutter replied.
                               
The visitors then left to catch the train to Brisbane, and the meeting proceeded to elect officers and enrol members o£ tho branch of the association.



There is no doubt that the area abounded with pineapple and fruit trees.



The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933) Friday 30 November 1894 p 7 Article
... .L.S. (lion, botanist), journeyed to Zillmere by tho early train to make a tour of inspection round the ... district. Mr. Roghan's farm, which lies on the north side of Albury's, is devoted chiefly to growing ...


 Throughout the different stories, the documents have related to those written by the Government, without many being voiced by the actual settlers.  Perhaps they were unable to express themselves, or to write.

To experience first hand the writings of one such immigrant, who arrived at the turn of the century, the link to "Dad's Story" is an enlightening read.


It was written by Christian Peter Christensen who later lived at Ridley Road, Aspley.

.......Once my brother and I decided that we would emigrate to Queensland, we started making our preparations. I got in touch with the agent and he forwarded all particulars and forms to be filled in. It was not until then that I discovered that there were some catches in this so-called free passage. 

First I had to send the sum of 2 Pounds or 40 Kroner to London. That was to pay for equipment needed on landing in Queensland and consisted as far as I can remember of two blankets, one fibre mattress, two tin plates, knife. fork and spoon, and I think there were also pillows. At that time Queensland employers did not provide accommodation as we were used to in Denmark - a worker had to supply his own eating utensils and bedding.

We also had to pay our own fare to England - that was another 2 Pounds. That made 4 Pounds in all or 80 Danish Kroner I had to find. I did not feel very happy about this as my year's wages at that time were only 180 Kroner.
As this was the end of the year, I had naturally spent some of my wages and also given my father some of it. However I sent the 40 Kroner to London - I gave it to our local postman to send for me. I had very little left to buy extra clothes with. 

Under the regulations set out by the Queensland Government we had to have a certain amount of clothes. A list was supplied, the most important item being two wool flannel shirts. Few workers wear these in Queensland these days, but at that period they were worn by all outdoor workers.......

.....So he had done what hundreds of others had to do when out of work, pack his swag and walk.
He had walked all the way from Bundaberg - about 200 miles - without hitting a job. We had some tucker left over from our first meal and were able to hand him some food through the window. He camped somewhere in the grounds for the night, and I didn't see him again. No doubt the newspapers had published our arrival as a few people came over looking for labour. They all wanted men who could milk. I had never milked a cow as that had always been done by the girls at home. 

However Niels had learned how to milk at the Agricultural School, so he soon got a job.
There were not many jobs offering, and I had been there two weeks and still had no work, nor had I any money. I could not even pay for a ferry across the river, and if I wanted to see the town I used to walk around by Victoria Bridge.

One morning they again called for a man who could milk. I was tired of hanging around, so I went up to the office. An elderly lady was sitting in the office. She spoke to me through an interpreter and asked "Can you milk?". I said "Yes" - the only word I knew in English. So I was engaged and had a
job. The wage was 10/- per week and keep. I thought of the 2 or 3 Pounds that the booklets had told us about when we first decided to come here!.......

1956 / by Christen Peter Christensen - The Danish Club in ...    ww.danishclubbrisbane.org/hist/DadStoryOrig4.pdf 2005 Trials and Tribulations of a Danish Migrant in Queensland 1900-1950. The online ... and bogs. A berry like a strawberry grew there and we kids and the .... When moving to the farm we had completed a circle with our places of abode, with ...... had built on his land at Lacey Road, Aspley ( now Carseldine),






It's what they did, walked - whatever the distance!  Imagine walking from Bundaberg to Brisbane,








For those who are related to the Pioneers of Bald Hills, spare a thought for the rules at the time!


Passages to Australia 1853

In the March 1853 "Colonization Circular No. 13 " there is notice of funds provided to the British Emigration Commissioners, by colonial revenues, for assisted passage, by New South Wales, Victoria and South Australia. (also stated, for the moment, is that funds were also available for Western Australia and Van Diemen's Land, but no funds were available for assisting persons wishing to emigrate to the North American Colonies) The rules for those wishing to apply were laid out thus:—                                          
PASSAGES TO AUSTRALIA
The following are the regulations and conditions under which emigrants are to be selected for passages to the Australian colonies, when there are funds available for the purpose.
QUALIFICATIONS OF EMIGRANTS
1. The emigrants must be of those callings which from time to time are most in demand in the colony. They must be sober, industrious, of general good moral character, and have been in the habit of working for wages, and going out to do so in the colony, of all of which decisive certificates will be required. They must also be in good health, free from all bodily or mental defects, and the adults must be in all respects be capable of labour and going out to work for wages, at the occupation specified on their Application Forms. The candidates who will receive a preference are respectable young women trained to domestic or farm service, and families in which there is a preponderance of females.

2. The separation of husbands and wives and of parents from children under 18 will in no case be allowed.

3. Single women under 18 cannot be taken without their parents, unless they go under the immediate care of some near relatives. Single women over 35 years of age are ineligible. Single women with illegitimate children can in no case be taken.

4. Single men cannot be taken unless they are sons in eligible families, containing at least a corresponding number of daughters.

5. Families in which there are more than 2 children under 7, or 3 children under 10 years of age, or in which the sons outnumber the daughters, widowers, and widows with young children, persons who intend to resort to the gold fields, to buy land, or to invest capital in trade, or who are in the habitual receipt of parish relief, or who have not been vaccinated or not had the small-pox, cannot be accepted.

But through all that adversity they survived!  They came, they settled and they multiplied!

So much so that often it becomes difficult in trying to follow a particular lineage.

In 1903 when the Electoral Rolls were prepared there were just 178 people recorded.
However, the extent of the area of Bald Hills was very large.

Bald Hills Census Records of 1903

The residents of Bald Hills were enlisted in the Moreton Electorate, division of Bald Hills in the 1903 Elections.   
Considerable information as to where they actually lived can be learnt.  They often listed the name of their property, and some of those would also have been in the Bracken Ridge area.  

Some streets and roads are no more, but the information and the family names provides a snapshot of Bald Hills/Bracken Ridge, 100 years ago. 

For easy reference the family name and the location is listed, not all the members of that family.

Females were usually referred to as domestic duties, unless specified differently

Baker
Clune
Day's Road
Domestic duties
Barbour
John, James Ann
Brown's Road
Farmer
Bastons
John, Florence
Greenwood's Pocket
Oysterman
Bolton
James
Bald Hills
Labourer
Campbell
Allan, Margaret, Mary
Bloomfield Farm
Labourer
Campling
Richard, Georgina
Neville's Road
Farmer
Carseldine
Edith
Post Office
Dressmaker
Carseldine
Amy
Post Office
Shop Assistant
Carseldine
Janet
Post Office
Storekeeper
Carseldine
Corrinne,  Eva
Post Office
Domestic duties
Carseldine
Arthur, Ethel, Elizabeth
Bald Hills Road
Clerk
Carseldine
Joseph, Sarah Alice
(On the)Sandgate Road
Farmer
Carseldine
Laura
(On the)Sandgate Road
School teacher
Clarke
Annie, Cecily, Edmond
Day's Road
Oysterman
Claybourne
Thomas, Louisa
Simpson's Rd
Farmer
Crabb
Humphrey
Bald Hills
Gardener
Cullimore
George, Mary
Bald Hills
Farmer
Davis
Henry, Mary
Bishop's Paddock
Labourer
Dawson
John, Elizabeth
Telegraph Road
Gardener
Day
Herbert, Alice
Cessford
Farmer
Day
Jane
Bald Hills Road
Domestic duties
Dunlea
Patrick Snr, Patrick Jnr, Catherine, Cecilia
Hennessey's Road
Farmer
Eagleton
Benjamin, Bridget
Bald Hills
Labourer
Ferguson
Richard, Susan
Brown's Road
Labourer
Feurriegel
Aldolph, Amelia, Anna Frederick
Day's Road
Labourer
Farmer
Fielding
Louisa, Thomas
State School Bald Hills
School Teacher
Fishley
Jane
Bald Hills
Domestic duties
Francis
William
Bald Hills
Farmer
Greenwood
Daniel, Ernest
Greenwood's Pocket
Labourer
Guy
John
Greenwood's Pocket
Labourer
Hawkins
Florence, Mary, William and William J
Bald Hills
Farmers
Hennessey
Patrick, Mary, Margaret, Matthew
Hennessey's Road
Farmers
Hinton
Arthur, Edith, Emmaline John
Springsure
Fruitgrowers
Kelly
Catherine, Thomas
Bald Hills
Railway employee
Kinnealy
Nora
North Coast Line
Gatekeeper
Kinnealy
Thomas
North Coast Line
Lengthman
Lacey
Joseph
Simpson's Road
Labourer
Lang
Oliver, Samuel, Samuel J, Salome A, Salome E, Sophia
Mayflower Farm
Farmers
Lang
Florence
Mayflower Farm
Tailoress
Laverack
Arthur, Emilia, Mabel, Margaret  James,
Neville's Road
Farmers
Laverack
Florence, Margaret
Neville's Road
Tailoress
Macpherson
Alexander
Bald Hills
Blacksmith
Macpherson
Kenneth
Bald Hills
Farmer
Macpherson
Florence, Isabella, Mary, Mary,
Bald Hills
Domestic duties
Meiklejohn
William, Harriet, Ethel
Bald Hills
Clergyman
Michael
William
Bald Hills
Farmer
Miles
Francis, Annie
Bald Hills Railway Station
Station-master
Mumford
Walter, William
Bald Hills
Farmer
McConachie
Eliza, Ina, James William
Oak Leigh
Clerk and Slater
McKenzie
Agnes
Bald Hills
Domestic duties
McMulin
John, Sarah,
Bald Hills
Farmer
McNeven
Hughie, John, Annie, Catherine
Bald Hills
Farmers
Neville
John, John W, Emma
Bishop's Paddock
Farmers
O'Donnell
Mary
North Coast Line
Gatekeeper
O'Donnell
Michael
North Coast Line
Lengthman
Rilley
John, Sarah
Bald Hills Pocket
Fisherman
Robinson
David
Bald Hills
Farmer
Robinson
Edward, Rosanna
Springfield, Gympie Rd
Labourer
Robinson
William
Bald Hills
Farmer
Rose
Samuel, Bella
Bald Hills
Farmer
Routhlege
Edward
Greenwood's Pocket
Oysterman
Service
Florence
Bald Hills Rd
Music teacher
Service
Madeline, David
Bald Hills Rd
Clerk
Simpson
John
Bald Hills
Clerk
Simpson
Samuel, Samuel Jnr, James
Bald Hills
Farmers
Simpson
Annie, Edith, Jane, Mary, Nancy
Bald Hills
Domestic duties
Smith
Cecil, Elizabeth, James
Bald Hills
Gardeners
Stewart
Alfred,
Bald Hills
Farmer
Stewart
Agnes, John  Snr, Mary
Woodlawn
Farmer
Stewart
John Jnr Elizabeth
Bald Hills Rd
Farmer
Thompson
Mary
Linton Vale
Domestic duties
Unwin
Joseph, Samuel, William, Elizabeth, Mary
Linton Vale
Farmers
Waldron
Annie, Francis
Simpson's Road
Farmer
Wells
William
Greenwood's Pocket
Labourer
Whereat
William, Louisa
Bald Hills
Farmer
Williamson
William, Charlotte
Dixon St
Labourer
Wilson
Alexander, Elizabeth, Elizabeth
Railway Hotel
Butcher
Wilson
Frederick
Bald Hills
Carpenter
Wilson
Gertrude
Railway Hotel
Barmaid
Wilson
Jane
Railway Hotel
Hotel-keeper
Wilson
Sarah
Bald Hills
Domestic duties
Wolne
John, Mary
Bald Hills
Cattle dealer
Wright
George
Bald Hills
Fruit grower
Young
Australia
Bald Hills
Tailoress
Young
Elizabeth, Isabella, Jane
Bald Hills
Domestic Duties
Young
James
Bald Hills
Carpenter
Young
William
Bald Hills
Blacksmith


So consider what a mammoth task it must have been in 1909 to assemble all the original settlers who came prior to 1859, for a photo shoot!   What a logistical achievement!














No 34 is J. Carseldine who arrived in 54 on the Monsoon and he was aged 67
Middle row second from the right

FIFTY YEARS IN QUEENSLAND:—LIVING PIONEER COLONISTS 
Name Date Ship. Present Age Name. Date. Ship. Present Age. 
Age. 
1 S. G Mee '52 Merlin 90                       26 D.J. Childs '49 Fortitude 65 
2 Wm. Southerden '49 Fortitude 76        27 Thos. Langtree '49 Black Bird 60 
3 H. Von Homrigh '50 Boomerang 71    28 -- Gillingwater '53 Agricola 77 
4 J. H. Yaldwyn '57 73                            29 J. Oberthur '55 Marps 75 
5 R. Menzics '50 Shakamaxon .73          30 Geo. Spencer '57 Vanquish 76 
6 W. Fryer '54 Irene 73 '                          31 Robt. Laing '58 Clarence 75 
7 Chas. Mellon '53 Agricola 64               32 Fred Jude '54 Gen Hewitt. 77 
8 Wm. Adams '51 John Fielding 50        33 Capt. Davis '58 Irene 73 
9 J. H. Hartmann '58 71                           34 J. Carseldine '54 Monsoon 67 


Somewhere in all our own shoeboxes and those horrible sticky page photo albums, we would have hundreds of old photos!  We just never realised that one day they would be significant!

There are hundreds of stories about Bald Hills post 1900 as well.  Many are related to the soldiers who served in World War I.  Those are dealt with in the Anzac Tribute.


From Garth Carseldine's  history:

Will Neville opened a sawmill in 1920 at Sandgate Road, it was closed down in the early 30's.

The first garage was opened about 1924 by Stan Balthorp and is the site of the present garage and service station owned by Nev Somers.

Henri Darrouzet opened a Chemist shop in 1953 and he moved to new premises in 1955.  George Fanning began his barber shop.

Dr Westall Smout, and his wife Doctor Ruth Smout began their medical practice in 1954.

On 2nd January 1932 Radio Station 4BH began broadcasting from Bald Hills but during the War its site was taken over by the National Stations which have since transferred their transmitter to another part of Bald Hills where the 650 ft mast is a prominent landmark.

The position of the transmitter is just north of a corroboree site, of the aborigines.

He tells of the school being unique for its record of pupils and teachers over generations.  Up to 1959, one family had representatives attending for 75 of the 91 years, whilst representative have taught for 48 years.  Since its opening there has been a Carseldine either enrolled as a pupil or attached as a member of the Teaching Staff.

More than a dozen pupils lost their lives in World War 1.

With regard to Churches, he mentions that Bald Hills was unique in that its churches outnumber its hotels by 4 to 1!  Since the early days the social life of Bald Hills has been centred on the church.

As the early settlers were Scots, the first church was  a Presbyterian.  It was erected on the corner of Strathpine and Sandgate Roads.  It was built by John and James Buckley for 30 pounds.  It opened in May 1863 and was used as a school from 1864, until the State school was opened.

The settlers who were associated with the church were:  Stewarts, Duncans, McPherson, Camerons, Campbells, Ross, Munro, McNiven, McCallum, Barber, and they carried on the Highland tradition of standing for prayers, and no  music.

The second Church was opened in 1899, it was struck by lightning and burnt in 1909.  The present Church opened in 1911.  The first manse was built in the late 1860's.  The house was still standing in 1859.  The present Manse was built in 1883.

The first Anglican Church was opened in 1913, in a small shop near the corner of Miller and Gympie Roads.  The church was situated in Dickson Street, around the telephone exchange.  The original church was destroyed by cyclone in 1919, and the present church erected on Sandgate Road in 1924.

The Roman Catholic Church was started in 1926 and opened in February 1927. 
The Salvation Army held its meetings in a small hall on Gympie Road.


From memory, perhaps the Bald Hills Kindergarten was the site of the Methodist Church? My own personal experience was with the playgroup here, and the use of the hall at the back in Ana Street, where there used to be a couple of old style houses on stumps which may have been associated with the Church.








The Brisbane Courier  December 1929

FOR THE MAN ON THE LAND.    

    

One of the Ayrshire milkers owned by Feuerriegel Bros., Bald  Hills.

BALD HILLS.  DAIRYING AND MARKET GARDENING.  By THOS. J. M'MAHON.    

Between 60 and 70 years ago the Bald Hills district was heavily covered with scrub, and possessed no other known resources than red cedar and pine. To-day it is closely settled, cleared, and improved, and admitted to be one of the most productive agricultural settlements within the metropolitan area.

The history of the early settlement  of Bald Hills, as recounted by   Messrs. K. Macpherson and W. J. Hawkins, who were born in the district, is particularly interesting. The earliest settlers came from the Hunter River district of New South Wales. They were Scottish folk, and for this reason the district was known for many years as the "Scotch settlement." Later, other settlers arrived-hardy, brave, and resourceful, men and women. Their descendants, in many cases, are prominent in the development and progress of the district to-day. Bald Hills, as many persons know, is one of the most picturesque  stages on the road from Brisbane to Redcliffe and other North Coast districts. 

The South Pine River Valley, stretching away to far-distant hills, provides one of the most beautiful pastoral scenes in the State. Watching the heavy traffic -mostly motor- passing through Bald Hills emphasises the progress made generally in half a century. In the '70's the district was regarded as remote from Brisbane-although the distance was only 12 miles -and in 1871 the news of the death of their Governor (Colonel Blackall) did not reach the settlers until two days later. A journey to Brisbane in those days was generally by horse dray, and took from four to five hours, as the roads were rough roads, and the creeks unbridged. To-day the distance can be covered in half an hour or so by motor car over bitumen roads and substantially-bridged creeks.

THE TOWNSHIP.

Forty years ago the township of Bald Hills comprised a school, a store (Carseldine's) a Presbyterian Church, and a few, farm houses in the scrub clearings. To-day it is an important business centre, with a railway station, Stores, a newsagency (Brisbane  papers are delivered daily before 7 a.m.), a post office, four prosperous  looking churches, a handsome Memorial School of Arts and hall, containing a fine honour board; a motor garage, and a State school with three teachers. and nearly 200 scholars. 

The Bald Hills school was one of the first opened in Queensland; it is No. 4 on the list. 
Bald Hills has a recreation ground of nearly 10 acres and sporting clubs flourish The fact that the district will have electric light very shortly is an evidence of continued progress in the early years the only  artificial light, of course, was provided   by kerosene or fat. One old resident can remember the corroborees that were held at night by the blacks who were very numerous.

EARLY SETTLERS

The earliest families included the Stewarts (the late Rev. James Stewart was a member of this family )-the Duncans, Macphersons, Hawkinses  Carseldines, Simpsons, Langs, Pashens, Dunleas, Hennesseys, Furriegels Camerons and Michaels. For the most part the earliest settlers were engaged in mixed farming, and sold their produce in Brisbane. Later the district came into some prominence owing to the cultivation of sugar and the establishment of a mill by Mr Lang, one of the settlers. 

Sugar cultivation, however was not successful owing to heavy frosts. About 30 or 40 years ago it was   realised the district was most suited to dairying and this has since become the chief industry. 

The majority of the settlers are interested in dairying, which is conducted on good sound lines, and warm milk supplied to Brisbane and Sandgate. More than 1000 gallons of milk are despatched from the district daily. The dairy herds, ranging from 30 to 100 head are of mixed breeds with Ayrshires  and Illawarras predominating.
The quality of the cattle is good. Bald Hills, even in dry times, is rich in pastures, and paspalum and Rhodes grasses thrive. While the cultivation of fodders, such as imphee, cow cane barley, oats, and wheat, is fairly general, quantities of feed are purchased when necessary in order to keep up the required quantity of milk of excel-lent quality.

 Prominent dairymen include Messrs. W. J. Hawkins, W. Carseldine, K. Macpherson, A. Stewart, F. Fredericks, Miller, and Simpson, Williamson, S. Lang, Robinson, Day, Fuerriegel Bros., Wylie, Dawson, A. J. Hawkins, W. J. Hawkins jun., and Michael. Mr. W. J. Hawkins, a successful settler, possessing a fine property and picturesque homestead, has been very active in furthering the interests of the districts dairying industry, and is credited with having been instrumental 31 years ago in the establishment of the first milk supply cold store in Brisbane, at the Roma-street railway station. Mr. Hawkins now favours a great central depot in the city and the pooling of the milk supply.

MARKET GARDENING.

From its earliest days the district has been one of the chief sources of supply of market garden produce to Brisbane, and has built up a considerable trade with the Sydney and Melbourne markets. Tomatoes and vegetables of all kinds grow remarkably well, and much enterprise is displayed by the settlers. Bald Hills has won fame in the Brisbane and Southern markets for its potatoes, which have a high reputation for size and quality. Those of the settlers who are mainly concerned with dairying are content to grow small patches of potatoes for family use, but others have from 28 to 30 acres under potatoes, and the yields are very profitable. These areas are irrigated, and as a result, even in the poorest seasons, profitable crops are obtained. The average yield is estimated at from five to six tons of potatoes to the acre. In conjunction with market gardening, and the cultivation of potatoes, fruit-such as pines, bananas, melons, and papaws is grown, and sold in the Brisbane market. Successful market gardeners, potato, or fruit growers, include Messrs. Roghan, Pask, Muller, Brown, Williams, and England.

WYAMPA.

Bald Hills was so named from the treeless hills which stood out prominently in the vast area of scrub lands. These hills to-day are the sites of   comfortable homesteads. Eight or 10 years ago the district situated in the pretty pocket between the South Pine River and Bald Hills creek was proclaimed a soldier settlement, and was given the name of Wyampa, the native name for Bald Hills.

 This area is about two miles from Bald Hills township, and up to the time of proclaiming it a soldier settlement it was regarded as of little use except for grazing a few dairy cattle. The soil was thought to be too "sour" for cultivation, and there was no permanent supply of fresh water. These disadvantages, with the fact that the areas of land available for selection were too small to assure a living, discouraged several of the settlers, and they left the settlement. Their holdings have since been taken up by other settlers, and the newcomers introduced Rhodes and Paspalum grasses, used fertilisers. constructed dams and wells, so that the agricultural prospects are now encouraging. Dairying is being carried on profitably, and warm milk is supplied to Brisbane and Sandgate. The dairy herds number from 20 to 60 head, and are of good quality and mostly Jersey and Ayrshires. Although fodder is grown the dairymen are obliged to buy large quantities of feed during the year In order to maintain the milk supply. Well-known dairymen in the area include Messrs. J. H. Baynes, F. C. Jensen, S. Dixon, and H. Stone.

FRUIT GROWING.

What can be done in the way of fruit growing has been demonstrated by Messrs. G. W. Carseldine and P.Hanafin, who, between them, have about eight acres of grapes, five of bananas, and three or figs, and there is every promise of generous yields. The grapes comprise Muscats, Hamburgs, Gros. Coleman, and Madeline. There are experimental plots of other varieties, which are doing well. A market for the fruit is found in Brisbane and Far Northern towns. The district has excellent prospects in the way of market gardening, and settlers are showing enterprise in this respect. Mr. H. Carvell, a soldier-settler, has displayed enterprise in the formation of a recreation reserve on his holding, which is situated on a pretty spot known as the "Deepwater Bend" of the South Pine River. 



The reserve is becoming popular with boating and fishing parties. Adjoining the reserve Mr. J. Reilly carries on net fishing and crabbing. The Wyampa settlers are doing excellent work in improving their district, but with the Bald Hills settlers they complain that the rates are unreasonably high. The main road through the Wyampa district is sadly in need of repair, and with the constant heavy traffic upon it, will soon become worse.


THE NAME "BALD HILLS."  Oct 1930  Brisbane Courier

Sir,-Recently a correspondent from the University inquired through the "Courier" as to the origin of the name Bald Hills, now a flourishing township on the North Coast Line. To that a reply was published from A. W.Carseldine, which would lead one to believe that the district was so named
because the hills were bare of timber.

But that idea is quite contrary to fact.

I was well acquainted with some of the earliest pioneers, and often heard this question discussed, and it always seemed a mystery why the district had been called Bald Hills. It was always stated, however, that the name was certainly not because the hills were devoid of timber, because..they were heavily timbered, with many trees of enormous growth. The flats were covered with dense vine scrub,
which extended well up the slopes, in some places to the top; but the hills were open forest country. By that I mean that there was no undergrowth.

In conversation with one of the old residents, who went there when only eight years of age, these views have been confirmed. I can remember when much of the land which is now cleared was heavily timbered, and when it was not possible to see much beyond what is now the township; and I can also remember the many old stumps of the trees that had been cut down on .the cleared portion. It is only during the last few years that some of these old stumps-were burnt out in the school paddock to make room for a cricket pitch. The school is built on one of the highest hills in the district.

I have heard the opinion expressed that the name Bald Hills was given not because the hills were bald but rather that they were bold, standing out clearly and boldly above the scrub below. The aboriginal name for the district is Wyampa. and I understand that name is' now given to the soldier settlement end of the district.

-I am. sir, &c, 

"OLD RESIDENT."
Tennyson, October l8,


Generations of Carseldines at Bald Hills.

There would not be one local resident who was not familiar with the name Carseldine.


Some of us went to school with a family member, some worked with them, and all along, not one of us probably ever thought about the origins of the family.

That story was been told, and moving down the generations of the different lineages would be impossible.

Briefly, the original family remained in Bald Hills and their children often became farmers elsewhere.

Among those "special" family photos is one of William Carseldine born 1872, his wife Mary Jane Tucker, and his daughter taken around 1905.
William was born in Bald Hills and the family later selected a grazing property at Colinton.  


 


Arthur Wesley Carseldine became a fruit and vegetable buyer, operating in the Brisbane Markets.


Maurice Arthur Carseldine member of the RAAF, he was trying to recover his home from a tenant!

RESCUE FROM SOUTH PINE RIVER
Mrs. H. Cook, of Gympie Road, Bald Hills, was rescued in an unconscious condition from the South Pine River at Bald Hills on Monday afternoon by Mr. Maurice Carseldine, of Bald Hills, who is a member of the Mowbray Park-Burleigh Heads Life Saving Club.

Mrs. Cook was swimming in about 10ft of water, when she was seized with cramp, and sank. Her daughter, Jean, noticed her plight, and raised the alarm. Mr. Carseldine, who was about 100 yards away, dived in and brought Mrs. Cook to the bank, she quickly recovered.




Alfred David Stewart married Rosamund Tucker in 1902, in the double wedding, and they lived at Bald Hills, probably on the family farm Woodlawn, with his brother John and elderly father John Senior.

Between 1905 and 1908 they moved to Narangba.  In 1913 Alfred had the store in Gympie Road Bald Hills which he ran for 15 years.  Later he sold, and they moved to Tennyson.

Alfred was involved in community affairs and was part of a deputation to the Railway Commissioner regarding increased rail services.  


RAILWAY GRIEVANCES.    23rd October 1900  The Brisbane courier

A deputation consisting of Messrs. W. Simpson (Geebung), and J. B. Young, J.Simpson, and A. W. Carseldine (Bald Hills) waited upon Mr. Gray, Commissioner for Railways, on Saturday morning, for the purpose of securing an improvement in the train service on the North Coast line. A train to convey workmen to the city by 8 o'clock in the morning was petitioned for, there being none at present for this purpose.
Also a train for business people, to arrive in Brisbane about 8.40 a.m. The train leaving Brisbane for Caboolture at present at 6.20 p.m. to leave about fifteen minutes earlier. A couple of other alterations being petitioned for, the Commissioner promised to give these matters his best attention.
The deputation then retired, after thanking the Commissioner for the interview allowed them.

In 1913 the following Carseldine family were living in Bald Hills.


In September 1904, he no doubt joined family at the 21st Birthday celebrations of George Carseldine.

On Friday evening last, 23rd inst, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Carseldine, of " Fairfield" Ball Hills, entertained about thirty the occasion of the 21st birthday of their second son, George. Music, games, etc., being kept up until the early h0urs of the morning. Mr. George Carseldine was the recipient of a large number of good wishes and useful presents. A pleasant evening was brought to a close 
by the singing of"Auld Lang Syne." Mr. Joseph Carseldine, by the way, is one of the pioneers of the Bald Hills district,having gone there to live 46 years ago, when a dray and two horses were the only means of getting to town, and when blacks roamed the countryside unmolested. 

 





A Pioneer.

To those who have helped to build up this State, a picture which will be of great interest is Jonathan Carseldine, one of Queensland's pioneers, by Mr. L. W. K. Wirth. Mr. Carseldine is one of the old Colonists who came out to Queens land in the ship Monsoon. in 1854 (having been born in Huntingdonshire, England, in 1842). After several years residence in the Valley, the family settled in the Bald Hills district. Upon marrying, the Carseldines removed to Sidling Creek, and afterwards to his present residence, Gregorsford, Upper Caboolture, where he has resided continuously for 38  years. Gregorsford is the site of the original Caboolture Station, and is the place occupied by Mr. Gregor and Miss Shannon, when murdered by the blacks in 1848. The spot where this took place is shown in Mr. Wirth's picture. "On Our Selection," in the present Exhibition, and is where the figures
(2 sons and 1 grandson) of Mr. Carseldine are standing. Both Mr. and Mrs.. Carseldine are living at present, and those who have been their guests at Gregorsford, look back with pleasure to the events of the early days told to their guests by their host and hostess. 


From the Queensland State Archives, this school enrolment of one of the Carseldine girls.1922

 




3 comments:

  1. Hello Kris, Seeing Garth Carseldine's name on this page prompted a memory or two from my mother's stories and there were many. Her memory was as sharp as ever up to the week before she died Apr 2015, just shy of her 100th. She recalled that she taught Garth to dance He was quite young at the time and shy. He never forgot that. Also gus davies was well known to the Jensens, mum said he was a wonderful cook and they often swapped recipies. As for the failure of post-World war 1...case studies, Dr Murray Johnson published quite a negative paper in The royal Historical Society of Queensland, Vol 20, No 9 February 2009 much was true, but there were more success stories than those he mentioned. I am pleased to say that my grandfather Charles Jensen did 'OK'. He was reared on the land at Attunga Springs, tamworth and having this vital knowledge would have been very helpful. After my grandmother died early in 1930 he continued farming and raising the children. My mum was his right hand woman, she loved the farm and admired both her father and brother. When he sold the Wyampa Road farm he bought a house in Attunga street Bald Hils from one, Mrs Lemon. He further built 2 or 3 houses and acquired a block of land that he left to my mother. So every child had a good start. His eldest son, Alan Jensen, became shire engineer of Mareeba NQ, the girls went on to marry and live long lives. My Aunt the last surviving child of Charles and Catherine is going to 'do a little' research in person soon i.e. she and her daughter are going to drive around to see if she can remember the block on which the farm stood. All of the aunts and uncle said many times, "...we walked the 1 and half miles to schooo and back...{or} we couldn't walk nearly 2 miles home from the dances unless there was a full moon.." cheers

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  2. Lovely to connect with families who are happy to share their stories.

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  3. Lovely to connect with families who are happy to share their stories.

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